Jeune Fille at Bare Bones
Hey Oklahoma, our short film “Jeune Fille" will be showing this Friday at the Bare Bones International Independent Film Festival! I’ll be there to support the film, so if you’re in or around Muskogee, definitely come hang out. It should be a good time.
- Joshua McQuilkin

Jeune Fille at Bare Bones

Hey Oklahoma, our short film “Jeune Fille" will be showing this Friday at the Bare Bones International Independent Film Festival! I’ll be there to support the film, so if you’re in or around Muskogee, definitely come hang out. It should be a good time.

- Joshua McQuilkin

More Thoughts on the HIMYM Finale

Major Spoilers

I’m only going to say this once, I’m talking about the end of “How I Met Your Mother”, so please don’t read on unless you’ve seen the series finale.

Previously on this blog, I talked about how much I loved ”How I Met Your Mother” and it’s bittersweet ending. Based on the first reviews I saw, I figured most agreed with me. But now it’s come to my attention that some fans are very angry about how this show came to a close. So let’s talk about it.

The main point that many people are making is “They spend last 3 seasons of the show setting up Barney and Robin’s wedding; they get divorced in the finale. They spend 9 seasons setting up for Ted to meet the Mother; she dies in the finale.” That would be a fair point, except that I kind of think it’s a miss-interpretation of the over arcing story. Let me explain; Ted’s story begins with him meeting Robin (he even tricks the kids into believing she’s the mother). He then goes on to detail his year long relationship with her and continues to bring her up as someone he never let go. I remember being confused by this when I was watching the series. I kept feeling that it was a mistake on the writer’s part to continue implying that Ted still had feelings for Robin. I now understand why.  

So let’s specifically address the Barney and Robin story. Yes it’s true that the entire last season (and portions of seasons 7 and 8) takes place at their wedding. But was the show really setting up for an “happy-ever-after” with those two? It didn’t feel like it to me. Much of that story revolves around Ted trying to find Robin’s locket, as a gesture of love. Where as both Robin and Barney try to get out of it just hours before the ceremony. Robin even tells Ted that she’s choosing the wrong guy. Now, I believe that Robin and Barney loved each other. That’s not the point I’m making. I’m simply trying to illustrate that the show was planting seeds of doubt. In fact, I clearly remember fans theorizing that Barney and Robin are divorced in the future.

Now let’s talk about The Mother. Many of us crossed our fingers and prayed that she wouldn’t be a disappointment… When finally met her, she couldn’t have been more perfect. Cristin Milioti was wonderful and so easy to fall in love with, she had a great chemistry with the cast. Best of all, she was a consistent character on the show in the last season, so we got to know her pretty well. If you were like me, and wanted that perfect “and kids, that’s how i met you’re mother’ moment, then you got it. 

Of course in the finale, our suspicions were confirmed that she was sick, and has passed away. I understand that some fans felt betrayed by this, but consider how beautiful the story is with that new perspective. Ted’s story to his children is optimistic and hopeful. He encourages his kids to believe in love even in the face of heartache. Ted’s story proves he hasn’t become bitter or syndical. He’s grateful for the years he had with their mother. Even now, six years after her death, he’s still believes that he can find love again. Yes, it’s sad, but it also makes the whole story more beautiful.

The finale also gave a lot of closure to other other characters. Lilly and Marshall stories were pretty much wrapped up by this point anyway, but Barney has a little girl, and for the first time, he has a relationship with a girl that isn’t based on sex (a play on “daddy’s home”). And of course Robin ends up with Ted at the end (thus completing “The Ted & Robin Pact”) 

The main point I am trying to get across is that the show actually makes more sense with this ending, than if it had all gone the other way.  All of these plot points were obviously set in place. In fact, this has been the planned ending since season 2. They even filmed part of it back in 2007, because Ted’s kids were going to get too old to reprise their rolls. So there really was no backing out. This is the story the writers set out to tell, and they were committed to it.

The last thing I want to say is how happy I was that the ending was bittersweet. So many finales try so hard to make everything perfect, that they end up feeling lukewarm and insignificant. The writers here had the balls to tell a story with a little heartache and tragedy, along with the same humor and heart the show was known for. Life is crazy, and it doesn’t always go the way we think. I feel this was the point the writers were trying to make. People meet, they fall in love, they get divorced, and they die. Know one knows how long we’ll have with the ones we love. We can only be grateful for the time we have.

Hopefully (like the finale of “The Sopranos”) the HIMYM finale will gain in popularity over the years. Those of us who loved it, really loved it. I’m just hoping others will come around at some point. 

- Joshua McQuilkin

Farewell HIMYM
Tonight we said goodbye to one of my favorite sitcoms of all time “How I Met Your Mother”. I have to say tonight’s finale was really beautiful. Equal parts funny, touching, and heartbreaking. I’m typically not a fan of laugh-track comedies, but “HIMYM” has always had a very special place in my heart. Perhaps because I related so much to the characters. If you haven’t seen it yet, go check it out for yourself. It’s on Netflix and it’s worth watching all the way through. Seasons 7 and 8 are weaker in general from the rest of the show, but it’s all worth it for the stellar finale.
Warning: Major Spoliers
I’m going to talk about the end of the show, so if you haven’t seen it, go watch it and come back. In the final season, the show did the remarkable. They introduced The Mother as a consistent character on the show, and she was a perfect fit. When a show has been on the air for 9 years, you’d think it would be difficult to find someone who had the same chemistry as the rest of the cast, but Cristin Milioti proved herself to be the right choice, and we got to fall in love with her too, just as Ted did.
In the finale, we learned that The Mother, whom Ted loved dearly, passed away years ago. And now, even all these years later, he still loves Robin. We now know this was the planned ending they secretly filmed back in season 2. I thought this was brilliant, and it explained a lot (though I would have to re-watch it all to make sure it holds up). But regardless if there are any plot holes, this show had a great heart, and it ended with the same hopeful and loving spirit it began with. That’s what I loved most about “How I Met Your Mother”. Yes it was very funny, and brilliantly written, but it was the heart of the show that kept me coming back for more. 
This show has meant a lot to me through the years, and as far as I’m concerned, it couldn’t have ended any better.
- Joshua McQuilkin

Farewell HIMYM

Tonight we said goodbye to one of my favorite sitcoms of all time “How I Met Your Mother”. I have to say tonight’s finale was really beautiful. Equal parts funny, touching, and heartbreaking. I’m typically not a fan of laugh-track comedies, but “HIMYM” has always had a very special place in my heart. Perhaps because I related so much to the characters. If you haven’t seen it yet, go check it out for yourself. It’s on Netflix and it’s worth watching all the way through. Seasons 7 and 8 are weaker in general from the rest of the show, but it’s all worth it for the stellar finale.

Warning: Major Spoliers

I’m going to talk about the end of the show, so if you haven’t seen it, go watch it and come back. In the final season, the show did the remarkable. They introduced The Mother as a consistent character on the show, and she was a perfect fit. When a show has been on the air for 9 years, you’d think it would be difficult to find someone who had the same chemistry as the rest of the cast, but Cristin Milioti proved herself to be the right choice, and we got to fall in love with her too, just as Ted did.

In the finale, we learned that The Mother, whom Ted loved dearly, passed away years ago. And now, even all these years later, he still loves Robin. We now know this was the planned ending they secretly filmed back in season 2. I thought this was brilliant, and it explained a lot (though I would have to re-watch it all to make sure it holds up). But regardless if there are any plot holes, this show had a great heart, and it ended with the same hopeful and loving spirit it began with. That’s what I loved most about “How I Met Your Mother”. Yes it was very funny, and brilliantly written, but it was the heart of the show that kept me coming back for more. 

This show has meant a lot to me through the years, and as far as I’m concerned, it couldn’t have ended any better.

- Joshua McQuilkin

Noah
After watching “Noah” I have to say, it’s arguably the greatest biblical film ever made. It’s rare kind of film because it feels very personal, and yet it has the scale of a blockbuster. Darren Aronofsky has crafted something very beautiful, and I was really impressed by it. 
I loved “Noah”, but that’s not exactly what I want to talk about. The fact that it’s a wonderful film, seems to be slightly obscured by the controversy that surrounds it. Christian audiences have constantly made it difficult for filmmakers to show any personal expression in the context of a Bible film. In fact, it’s kind of an impossible situation . If the filmmaker takes any liberty at all, it’s criticized for not being “accurate”. If however, the filmmaker was to stay completely true to the source material, well they don’t always like that either because the Bible is often darker and more graphic than our Sunday school classes would have lead us to believe. So to please that target demographic, it seems the work has to be so lukewarm, that it makes no impact at all. 
(The one exception to that rule would be “The Passion of the Christ”, as it managed to attract Christian audiences despite it’s R-rating) 
Sadly a film like this is also a target for Atheists, who attack it simply because it’s based on a biblical story. I think that’s wrong too. Even if a person doesn’t believe in the source material, it seems to me that they should still be able to enjoy the experience of the film. And that’s the point I want to make…
"Noah" is a work of art. That’s how it should be viewed. Not as a literal piece of history, and not as a Sunday school lesson. It’a beautifully crafted film by a very talented filmmaker. Yes, it’s a bold and daring interpretation, but that’s also what makes it special. Aronofsky’s artistic liberties are used to great effect, and make for a powerful and personal expression of this well known story. 
Of course, I’ve made some generalizations in this blog post, but my point remains the same. Regardless of your faith or religion, you should see Darren Aronofsky’s film. Not because of any reason other than the fact that it’s an excellently crafted film. If you have an open mind, I think you’ll really like it. 
- Joshua McQuilkin  

Noah

After watching “Noah” I have to say, it’s arguably the greatest biblical film ever made. It’s rare kind of film because it feels very personal, and yet it has the scale of a blockbuster. Darren Aronofsky has crafted something very beautiful, and I was really impressed by it. 

I loved “Noah”, but that’s not exactly what I want to talk about. The fact that it’s a wonderful film, seems to be slightly obscured by the controversy that surrounds it. Christian audiences have constantly made it difficult for filmmakers to show any personal expression in the context of a Bible film. In fact, it’s kind of an impossible situation . If the filmmaker takes any liberty at all, it’s criticized for not being “accurate”. If however, the filmmaker was to stay completely true to the source material, well they don’t always like that either because the Bible is often darker and more graphic than our Sunday school classes would have lead us to believe. So to please that target demographic, it seems the work has to be so lukewarm, that it makes no impact at all. 

(The one exception to that rule would be “The Passion of the Christ”, as it managed to attract Christian audiences despite it’s R-rating) 

Sadly a film like this is also a target for Atheists, who attack it simply because it’s based on a biblical story. I think that’s wrong too. Even if a person doesn’t believe in the source material, it seems to me that they should still be able to enjoy the experience of the film. And that’s the point I want to make…

"Noah" is a work of art. That’s how it should be viewed. Not as a literal piece of history, and not as a Sunday school lesson. It’a beautifully crafted film by a very talented filmmaker. Yes, it’s a bold and daring interpretation, but that’s also what makes it special. Aronofsky’s artistic liberties are used to great effect, and make for a powerful and personal expression of this well known story.

Of course, I’ve made some generalizations in this blog post, but my point remains the same. Regardless of your faith or religion, you should see Darren Aronofsky’s film. Not because of any reason other than the fact that it’s an excellently crafted film. If you have an open mind, I think you’ll really like it. 

- Joshua McQuilkin